Traditional Costumes for Children’s Day

Children’s Day or Komodo No Hi is one of the most celebrated holidays in Japan. Together with their families, boys and girls decorate their houses with carp streamers and dolls of Japanese heroes for the entire month of May. These symbols promote success, prosperity, strength, and courage for Japanese boys. During the holiday, families eat sweet rice…

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Traditional Japanese Clothing and Age

Most traditional Japanese clothing changes based upon the weather and the season. Thicker kimonos are worn in the colder months with winter-inspired patterns and designs. In the summer, kimonos feature brighter colors and thinner fabrics. However, there are also several times during childhood and as a young adult when a Japanese child wears specific kimono color or design based upon traditional…

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Geta: Walking the Japanese Way

The Japanese are known for having intricate rituals and wonderfully embedded traditions that still affect their modern way of living. One of these subtle traits that make the Japanese unique is the way they walk. Although subtle in everyday cases, this characteristic is definitely distinguishable and remains easily correlated to Japan and its history. All-Purpose…

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The Essence of the Yukata

Yukatas, at first glance, looks quite like kimonos. Both being robes with drooping sleeves that are bound with a silky belt. Intended as bathrobes, even their name means “bathing clothes.” They were once made of simple dyed cotton and relegated to the bathhouse. However, the more casual and lightweight yukata has taken over as the…

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The History of Happi Coats

Happi Coats are short, wide-sleeved overcoats traditionally worn by workers in Japan. Like most clothing in Japan, they wrap around the body like a robe. But unlike the kimono, they only extend to the waist or hip. Based on the traditional haori, which in turn derives from historical Chinese fashion. They are treated like uniforms and…

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Traditional Occasions for Wearing Kimonos

There are many festivals, events, and circumstances where it is traditional to wear a kimono in Japan. Even though Western clothes have become prevalent in much of day to day wear: 1. Birth of a child. Wearing Kimonos In Japanese culture, as in many others, the birth of a child is considered a milestone. When…

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Traditional Japanese Fashion 101: Yukata vs Kimono

This long-sleeved, belted robe is a staple look of Japanese fashion—a newcomer to the Eastern daily wardrobe. The yukata is commonly mistaken for a casual kimono. But upon a closer look, these two garments are very different in modern Japanese society. What is the difference? In short, their fabrics, levels of formality, Yukata vs. Kimono…

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The Obi: A Staple of Japanese Fashion

The obi remains one of the most elaborate parts of traditional Japanese fashion. It began as a simple sash a few inches wide that served purely to tie clothes in place. However, much like the kimono itself, it evolved into a fashion statement during the Edo period. Once a plain strip of cloth became a…

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Giving Japanese Kimonos as Gifts

Having trouble choosing kimonos as a gift for a friend? Let Japanese Style help! We have a few tips for choosing an appropriate kimono and a wide selection of both kimono and yukata. Seasons Like many other nations, Japan associates certain colors with certain seasons. And that trend affects what people wear during certain parts…

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Kimono Patterns

While a kimono can be made with any beautiful art, certain recurring Kimono Patterns and images have meaning rooted in Japanese tradition.  Many modern patterns are influenced by designs found in western society. Flowers Flowers, varying by the season, are perhaps the most common kimono motif, and the symbolism of flowers in Japan could fill…

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